.
.

Welcome

  • India’s most comprehensive parenting portal, with excerpts from ParentEdge – India’s leading parenting magazine

Parents’ Guide to the Birds and Bees Talk


Talking to children about puberty and sex education

Source: Google Images

While pondering on the issue of sharing sensitive information about the reproductive system with your growing child, my mind automatically veered towards my childhood. This is a kind of metric standard with me wherein I compare the happenings of my growing up years with that of my child. By doing that one automatically gets the answers to innumerable and difficult decisions that is parenting.

My parent  were quiet but social people. There were innumerable family friends whom we met at frequent intervals. I often remember picking up my books while going out to visit one of them. There all the kids would sit together and study, with the elder ones helping out the younger lot. This exchange of knowledge was done on many levels, not all linked to the studies. So as my circle of acquaintance was not restricted to kids exactly my age, I gained a lot of knowledge.

I still remember the vivid lecture I got from the eldest daughter of a family friend. She explained in a lot of detail all about mensuration and how to deal with it. After that there was a checking of facts.

She: Do you have your periods?

Me: err..What?  No…

She: Hmmmm how old are you?

Me:13

She: (Nodding sagely) There is  time…

Those were the good old days (I am sounding like my grandma) where girls did not mature that fast. Now the girls are known to start menstruating at 10. What does that indicate – that a child of 10 is ready to reproduce? The mind boggles.

Anyways after this lecture there was a statutory warning.

She: You will have them soon. And then your mom will tell you all this. There is no need to jump up and down and say you know it all. Just sit quietly and nod your head.

Some months passed and there was no advent of puberty for me. So I went back to didi, my fount of knowledge, the encyclopaedia.

Me: What does it mean when one does not have periods?

She: Usually it means you are going to have a baby.

Obviously the question and the answer were in absolutely different perspective. But that got me immensely worried. For months I was worried to death that I may produce a baby. I even checked in the toilet bowl to see whether I had dropped one there or something. When my periods arrived was I relieved.

Reviews

  • Total Score 0%
User rating: 0.00% ( 0
votes )


Sia Mitra is a freelance writer and blogger with more than a decade of experience. She has written for most major publications like Femina, Prevention, Complete Well-being, Child, Mother & Baby, Parent & Child, Womens Era, etc.


4 thoughts on “Parents’ Guide to the Birds and Bees Talk

  1. Ramya

    Quite hilarious Sia.

    Children do pick up nuggets of (mis)information, don’t they?

    It is best to share factual, age appropriate information as children grow up rather than do a one-shot, lecture when we think they are ready.

    Coincidentally, the upcoming March issue has two articles related to your post – a Spotlight article on Early Puberty and an Everyday Parenting article on Tackling tough questions and sticky situations.

    Ramya

    Reply
  2. Kritika Srinivasan

    Lol! Very funny, especially the bit about checking in the toilet bowl to see if you have randomly dropped a kid inside! But yes, you make a good and valid point behind all that humour. We tread a thin line between keeping kids informed and taking away their innocence at an early age. But given that the world does not lend itself to innocence any longer and that children are bombarded by images of violence, sex and unpleasant realities, it is better that they learn to view these in an informed manner rather than with a prejudiced eye! And that information had best come from parents!

    Reply
  3. Aparajita Bose

    I just loved it for the wonderful suggestions and tips coated with humour.
    Sia, I have a question for you.
    Do you think or not if fathers had a heart-to-heart talk with the sons and the moms with the daughters, it would be the best thing possible instead of leaving it all for the moms?

    Reply
  4. Sia

    Aparajita, fathers are an embarressed lot. 9 out of 10 they will badly bungle it all. But i guess it would be better for the boy to get a masculine perspective.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>